Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

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A Wonder Filled Coast

The Pembrokeshire Coast isn’t what you might expect from a National Park. It’s split into four parts, each one with its own quirks and charms.

It’s one of the smallest of the UK’s National Parks but don’t let the size fool you, you’re at the gateway to a range of stunning landscapes. The quality coastline is backed by hills, estuaries, valleys and woodlands just waiting to be discovered.

Key activities

A Walking Wonderland
Activity

A Walking Wonderland

With over 600 miles of public footpaths and bridleways, walking is an ideal way to discover the Pembrokeshire Coast’s scenery, wildlife and history.

Wildlife Watching
Activity

Wildlife Watching

Explore the amazing wildlife that makes its home on the Pembrokeshire Coast - not forgetting the exciting array of seasonal wildlife which also visits year after year.

Miles of Golden Sands
Activity

Miles of Golden Sands

Britain's only truly coastal National Park boasts a variety of beaches. Some are easy to reach and ideal for families, others are less accessible but offer peace and quiet.

Special qualities

Special qualities

5 reasons why the Pembrokeshire Coast is a special place

The Pembrokeshire Coast is the only UK National Park which is primarily designated for its coastal landscape.


It’s one of the smallest UK National Parks, but has one of the most diverse landscapes, covering almost all the Pembrokeshire Coast, every offshore island, the Daugleddau estuary and large areas of the Preseli Hills and the Gwaun Valley.


It’s home to the Pembrokeshire Coast Path National Trail – a spectacular 186 mile (299 km) long National Trail covering some of the most varied coastal scenery in Britain.


It is ecologically one of the richest and most diverse parts of Wales and is recognised as of international importance for a wide range of high quality habitats and rare species.


The Park has a rich cultural and built heritage, being home to 286 Scheduled Ancient Monuments and 1234 listed buildings.


Did you know?

Nowhere in the National Park is more than ten miles from the sea.

The coast with the most

The Pembrokeshire Coast is the home of outdoor adventure for all, from high energy watersports to relaxing walks and wildlife watching, while there’s more to explore indoors if you want to escape the elements.

No visit is complete without a walk on the Pembrokeshire Coast Path, but you don’t have to be an experienced explorer to enjoy the route.

The Path passes all the area’s beautiful beaches, links with nearby footpaths and with some stretches accessible to wheelchair users and families with prams and pushchairs, it’s easier than ever to tick this off your bucket and spade list.

Walking the entire route is no mean feat – in fact, the total rise and fall of the Coast Path is over 35,000 feet – greater than the height of Mount Everest.

But there’s no rule to say you’ve got to walk it all. In fact, there are many different ways you can use the Path to discover the Park. You can reduce the route into a series of sections to suit your aims and ability.

Getting around

The Pembrokeshire Coastal Bus Services help locals and visitors get to the coast without having to use a car, travelling along the coast to provide access to walks, beaches, boat trips, local villages and attractions.

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